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Spring Wildlife Information

(What to do)

"HOW TO HELP BABY SQUIRRELS"

*** Baby squirrels eyes open at 4 weeks, begin exploring outside the nest by 6 weeks, and are weaned by 10 weeks. At the age of 10-12 weeks a squirrel is independent. If you find a squirrel that has a fluffed out tail, a body longer than 6 inches (NOT INCLUDING THE TAIL), and who tries to approach humans or pets (DISCOURAGE THIS BEHAVIOR BY TRYING TO SCARE IT BY MAKING LOUD NOISES WHEN IT COMES NEAR) - it is a juvenile and you do not need to intervene.
*** If you find a baby squirrel that appears health and unhurt and you know where the nest is and the nest can be reached safely, wear gloves, hover the baby with a light cloth and gently pick it up and put it back into the nest.
*** If you can not put the baby into the nest
1. Prepare a shallow box (shoebox) with a piece of flannel, t-shirt, or fleece. 
2. Provide a little warmth: place uncooked rice or birdseed in a sock and warm it in the microwave for 20-30 seconds. Wrap the sock in a soft towel and place it with the baby in an open container. Scrunch the flannel or fleece around the baby.
3. Place the box outside close to where you found the baby or you suspect the nest is. Protect from sun or precipitation with piece of cardboard or plywood laid at a slant against side of box.
4. Keep pets and children away and remain out of sight (mothers will not return if any people or pets are around). Give the mother 6-8 day light hours to retrieve the baby. reheat the rice/birdseed every two hours. If the mother does not retrieve the baby after 8 hours or so, there's a good chance that the baby squirrel is orphaned and needs to be taken to a rehabilitator for care.

***A BABY SQUIRREL HAS THE BEST CHANCE OF SURVIVAL WHEN IT'S CARED FOR BY ITS MOTHER! ***

IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS PLEASE CALL WILD FOREVER FOUNDATION @ 475-WILD (9453)

"SPRING WILDLIFE INFORMATION"

Most wildlife babies are born in the spring; so spring and early summer are the busiest time for calls about sick, injured, or orphaned wildlife. However, in many cases, mammals and birds that appear to be injured or orphaned are really just young going through a stage of their development. For example, normal behavior for a fledgling (baby bird with feather and a "stumpy" tail that has jump-fluttered from the nest) is to hop and flutter around on the ground for several days. Usually the parents are nearby watching the baby bird prepare itself for flight. The adult birds will feed and protect the baby until it is ready to fly off on its own in a few days.

Similarly, fawns will lie quietly in the grass, hidden by their camouflage coloration, while their mother are off feeding (thus is to protect the babies by not revealing their location to predators). Does will usually return by dusk to nightfall but occasionally may be gone up to 24 hours.

Baby rabbits are left alone most of the time - mother rabbits are seldom ever seen at the nest. If the bunnies are plump and healthy looking - leave them be. If a young rabbit has its eyes open and ears up; is fully furred, larger than a baseball, and weighs more than 4 ounces - it is on its own and does not need human intervention.

Thus all animals should be observed for a while before they are picked up and mistakenly "rescued". Call or text WILD FOREVER FOUNDATION @ 475-WILD (9453) before handling wildlife.

Call 719-632-0222 to make an appointment!

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We were visiting from out of state with our 4 dogs, when our eldest dog took a turn for the worst. Our neighbor recommended Belcrest. They got us in immediately due to our dog's symptoms. It's not a fancy building but it is clean - less overhead. Each step of the way they checked with us regarding price and received our consent. And the kind, responsive care was excellent. Compared to other vets we've used throughout the 25 years of pet ownership, I found their prices quite reasonable.

We had to make the most difficult, heart wrenching decision, and I appreciated the competence of the doctor, her sincerity, and honesty regarding our beloved dog's suffering. To be away from our regular vet was hard enough, and I was grateful for Belcrest for honoring Flopsy and us through this trying time. Thank you to the techs and veterinarian that treated us kindly. I don't remember anyone's name because I was quite emotional at the time.

Sarah D.
Colorado Springs, CO

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